Grover Supports The Finissage of SIGNALS, Art About The Snowden Files

Grover’s mission to offer an alternative way to access and own technology has led us to a lot of interesting places.

It’s part of why we started MONTAG Magazine, to question how technology will affect us in the future. It’s also why we’re so interested in how technology can change things today: particularly for artists and creators.

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While not an official collaboration through our Creators Get Grover program, we were happy to support the international performer SAZAE BOT in their performance at the finissage of an exhibition called SIGNALS at Diamondpaper Studio in Berlin.

The exhibition, curated by Magdalena Taube and Krystian Woznicki, founders of the online magazine Berliner Gazette, featured work from a very diverse group of artists whose subject matter was the same: the NSA files leaked by Edward Snowden. SAZAE BOT opened the finissage with a performance. The “dreaming robot,” lying by the window, provided a visual focus while the audience heard disclosure from the PRISM documents and the sound of the documents being printed in the back of the exhibition space. Read more about SAZAE BOT’s vision, presenting these documents as a dream through the prism of art.

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After SAZAE BOT, Simon Denny, a Berlin-based contemporary artist from New Zealand, presented his work with the Snowden files. He dissected imagery in the NSA documents, finding sources for much of the bizarre visual language, and re-presented it, monumentalized in his own exhibition of NSA art:

Following Denny’s presentation about his exhibitions working with the NSA materials was a discussion between Denny and the artist, archivist, and information scientist Andrew Clement. A lively Q & A ensued, exploring both artists’ and computer scientists’ motivations to delve into the leaked documents, how mass surveillance may be a threat to democracy, and how we can live with the ubiquity of technology while becoming aware of its dangers.

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Despite having its closing performance this week, the exhibition will still be open to the public and to educational groups through October.

Do you have a creative project in mind, but need some tech support? Apply for our Creators program to make your dreams a reality.